↑ top

Fellowships

Taubman College of Architecture and Urban Planning at the University of Michigan offers three fellowships in the areas of architectural research and instruction, as well as one fellowship in the area of urban and regional planning.

Each of the fellowships includes teaching related to the candidate's area of interest, resources for the development of work, possibilities to interface with scholars and researchers in the wider university context, and the opportunity to share the outcome of the fellowship with the College. Fellows spend one year in residence and teach three classes in addition to pursuing their fellowship interests.

Michigan-Mellon Design Fellows in Egalitarianism and the Metropolis

The Michigan/Mellon Project on Egalitarianism and the Metropolis is a 4-year academic and research initia- tive focused on architecture, urbanism and humanities research in Detroit, Mexico City and Rio de Janeiro, is made possible by a $1.3 million grant from the A. W. Mellon Foundation. The project allows theory and practice to inform and be informed by questions of social justice, social movements and transformative creative arts movements - both past and present. The emphasis on cities and their specificity will focus humanists on linking theories of human interaction and collective life with the physical space of a city and its histories. The increased expertise in urbanism allows for humanists to better understand the market forces and economic constraints that inform design decisions that directly affect human life. Designers benefit from direct engagement with humanities scholarship that can more amply critique the structural inequalities driven by, for example, racial or socio-economic disparities (arising out of ideological biases) that have been impediments to urban development. The project, launched in Fall 2014, includes lecture and seminar courses, research fellowships, symposia, colloquia and films, exhibitions and publications. 

Design Fellows are expected to pursue independent research projects at the intersection of architecture, urbanism and the humanities, with particular emphasis on the role of egalitarianism in shaping metropolitan regions. Fellows’ research work should also address aspects of one or more of the focus cities (Detroit, Mexico City DF and/or Rio de Janeiro). Through faculty mentorship, colloquia and symposia, Fellows will join an intellectual community in which work in progress is shared and interrogated by a community of designers and scholars. Design Fellows will teach two design studios per term in the Michigan Architecture Prep Program - a semester-long architecture enrichment program for high school juniors in the metro Detroit area. Each Fellow will receive work space at the Michigan Research Studio, a 3,700sf space in midtown Detroit. Fellows are encouraged to seek support from external agencies if it appears that their scholarly and creative work will be enhanced by such grants. At the end of each fellowship year, Fellows are required to submit a written report on their activities and are encouraged to present their work to a public audience. 

2015-2016 Call for Applications

Michigan-Mellon Humanities Fellows in Egalitarianism and the Metropolis

The Michigan/Mellon Project on Egalitarianism and the Metropolis is a 4-year academic and research initia- tive focused on architecture, urbanism and humanities research in Detroit, Mexico City and Rio de Janeiro, is made possible by a $1.3 million grant from the A. W. Mellon Foundation. The project allows theory and practice to inform and be informed by questions of social justice, social movements and transformative creative arts movements - both past and present. The emphasis on cities and their specificity will focus humanists on linking theories of human interaction and collective life with the physical space of a city and its histories. The increased expertise in urbanism allows for humanists to better understand the market forces and economic constraints that inform design decisions that directly affect human life. Designers benefit from direct engagement with humanities scholarship that can more amply critique the structural inequalities driven by, for example, racial or socio-economic disparities (arising out of ideological biases) that have been impediments to urban development. The project, launched in Fall 2014, includes lecture and seminar courses, research fellowships, symposia, colloquia and films, exhibitions and publications. 

Humanities Fellows are expected to pursue independent research projects at the intersection of architecture, urbanism and the humanities, with particular emphasis on the role of egalitarianism in shaping metropolitan regions. Fellows’ research work should also address aspects of one or more of the cities-metros (Detroit, Mexico City DF and/or Rio de Janeiro). Through faculty mentorship, colloquia and symposia, Fellows will join an intellectual community in which work in progress is shared and interrogated by a community of scholars and designers. Humanities Fellows will teach three seminar/discussion sections per year - these sections may be affiliated with a lecture course on the Program themes and/or large seminar courses focussed on aspects of post-industrial and megacity issues. Each Fellow will receive work space at the University of Michigan. Fellows are encouraged to seek support from external agencies if it appears that their scholarly and creative work will be enhanced by such grants. At the end of each fellowship year, Fellows are required to submit a written report on their activities and are encouraged to present their work to a public audience. 

2015-2016 Call for Applications

Muschenheim Fellowship / Architecture / Design

The Muschenheim Fellowship offers design instructors early in their career the opportunity to develop a body of work in the context of teaching. Muschenheim fellows play a significant role in the definition of studio culture while pursuing their own creative endeavors. Proposals for the Muschenheim Fellowship focus upon the development of a specific project individually or with students, outside of teaching or center upon a particular set of pedagogical themes to be engaged in the studio context.

Muschenheim Digital Archive at the Bentley Historical Library, University of Michigan.

Oberdick Fellowship / Architecture / Project

The Oberdick Project Fellowship facilitates the development and realization of a significant exploration into some aspect of architectural speculation and production. Fellows are provided with resources for the execution of a project that may take the form of an exhibit, publication, installation, or any other material construction. Projects may range from the exploration of emergent building, fabrication, and environmental technologies to the realization of architectural works and endeavors typically unsupported within conventional models of practice.

Sanders Fellowship / Architecture / Research

The Sanders Fellowship supports individuals with significant, compelling and timely research dealing with architectural issues. Research could dwell within architectural, urban, landscape, or cultural history or theory; architectural or environmental technology; or design studies. These agendas could emerge from recently-completed doctoral dissertations or other intense and rigorous research format. The fellowship will support both research and the development of research-related curriculum. 

Sojourner Truth Fellow Position / Planning

This position is intended to recruit scholars who will bring issues of race and ethnicity into teaching and research in any substantive area related to urban and regional planning for a semester or an academic year. Professors on sabbatical, faculty beginning teaching careers, students who are writing dissertations, reflective practitioners, and individuals at any other stages of their careers are invited to apply. Applicants should have interest in educating both professionally oriented students and future scholars and are expected to be committed to scholarly and/or creative and professional work. 

Taubman College Metropolitan Detroit Fellows

Each year Taubman College of Architecture and Urban Planning (Taubman) selects 4-6 recent alumni of its Architecture Program to conduct research on metropolitan Detroit and post-industrial issues affecting the city and its region; and to participate as instructional faculty in a program that offers instruction in architecture and design to high school sophomores and juniors in the Detroit metropolitan area. Each Fellow has a one-year appointment as Metropolitan Detroit Fellow in Taubman College and a one-year appointment as a Taubman Architecture High School Fellow in the Taubman Architecture High School Dual Enrollment Program. This appointment is not tenure-track. The current annual stipend is $32,000. Fellows are eligible for participation in the University health , dental and life insurance programs. Each fellow is expected to teach the equivalent of one academic year, i.e., a total of two terms during the period of the fellowship. Any subsequent appointment of a Fellow to a position at the University of Michigan would be subject to the rules governing new appointments.