↑ top

Michigan-Mellon Project: Fellows

Michigan-Mellon Design Fellows in Egalitarianism and the Metropolis

The Michigan/Mellon Project for Egalitarianism and the Metropolis is now accepting Fellowship Applications for the 2017 - 2018 school year

The Michigan/Mellon Project on Egalitarianism and the Metropolis is a 4-year academic and research initia- tive focused on architecture, urbanism and humanities research in Detroit, Mexico City and Rio de Janeiro, is made possible by a $1.3 million grant from the A. W. Mellon Foundation. The project allows theory and practice to inform and be informed by questions of social justice, social movements and transformative creative arts movements - both past and present. The emphasis on cities and their specificity will focus humanists on linking theories of human interaction and collective life with the physical space of a city and its histories. The increased expertise in urbanism allows for humanists to better understand the market forces and economic constraints that inform design decisions that directly affect human life. Designers benefit from direct engagement with humanities scholarship that can more amply critique the structural inequalities driven by, for example, racial or socio-economic disparities (arising out of ideological biases) that have been impediments to urban development. The project, launched in Fall 2014, includes lecture and seminar courses, research fellowships, symposia, colloquia and films, exhibitions and publications. 

Design Fellows are expected to pursue independent research projects at the intersection of architecture, urbanism and the humanities, with particular emphasis on the role of egalitarianism in shaping metropolitan regions. Fellows’ research work should also address aspects of one or more of the focus cities (Detroit, Mexico City DF and/or Rio de Janeiro). Through faculty mentorship, colloquia and symposia, Fellows will join an intellectual community in which work in progress is shared and interrogated by a community of designers and scholars. Design Fellows will teach two design studios per term in the Michigan Architecture Prep Program - a semester-long architecture enrichment program for high school juniors in the metro Detroit area. Each Fellow will receive work space at the Michigan Research Studio, a 3,700sf space in midtown Detroit. Fellows are encouraged to seek support from external agencies if it appears that their scholarly and creative work will be enhanced by such grants. At the end of each fellowship year, Fellows are required to submit a written report on their activities and are encouraged to present their work to a public audience. 

2017-2018 Call for Applications (PDF) - Submission Deadline: January 11, 2017

2017-2018 Design Fellows (PDF)

Michigan-Mellon Humanities Fellows in Egalitarianism and the Metropolis

The Michigan/Mellon Project for Egalitarianism and the Metropolis is now accepting Fellowship Applications for the 2017 - 2018 school year

The Michigan/Mellon Project on Egalitarianism and the Metropolis is a 4-year academic and research initia- tive focused on architecture, urbanism and humanities research in Detroit, Mexico City and Rio de Janeiro, is made possible by a $1.3 million grant from the A. W. Mellon Foundation. The project allows theory and practice to inform and be informed by questions of social justice, social movements and transformative creative arts movements - both past and present. The emphasis on cities and their specificity will focus humanists on linking theories of human interaction and collective life with the physical space of a city and its histories. The increased expertise in urbanism allows for humanists to better understand the market forces and economic constraints that inform design decisions that directly affect human life. Designers benefit from direct engagement with humanities scholarship that can more amply critique the structural inequalities driven by, for example, racial or socio-economic disparities (arising out of ideological biases) that have been impediments to urban development. The project, launched in Fall 2014, includes lecture and seminar courses, research fellowships, symposia, colloquia and films, exhibitions and publications. 

Humanities Fellows are expected to pursue independent research projects at the intersection of architecture, urbanism and the humanities, with particular emphasis on the role of egalitarianism in shaping metropolitan regions. Fellows’ research work should also address aspects of one or more of the cities-metros (Detroit, Mexico City DF and/or Rio de Janeiro). Through faculty mentorship, colloquia and symposia, Fellows will join an intellectual community in which work in progress is shared and interrogated by a community of scholars and designers. Humanities Fellows will teach three seminar/discussion sections per year - these sections may be affiliated with a lecture course on the Program themes and/or large seminar courses focussed on aspects of post-industrial and megacity issues. Each Fellow will receive work space at the University of Michigan. Fellows are encouraged to seek support from external agencies if it appears that their scholarly and creative work will be enhanced by such grants. At the end of each fellowship year, Fellows are required to submit a written report on their activities and are encouraged to present their work to a public audience. 

2017-2018 Call for Applications (PDF) - Submission Deadline: January 11, 2017

2017-2018 Humanities Fellows (PDF)

2016 - 2017 MICHIGAN-MELLON FELLOWS IN EGALITARIANISM AND THE METROPOLIS

Design Fellows:

Paulina Reyes

Paulina Reyes holds a Bachelor of Architecture from Carnegie Mellon University. Her undergraduate thesis focused on the impact of the US/Mexico border fence on bi-national flow, and proposed polemical alternatives to its design. Upon graduation, she spent a year living in Mexico City as a Fulbright Fellow, during which she developed a research project centered on the integration of water sustainability in the design of low-income public housing. Subsequently, she engaged in fieldwork with local architects, NGOs, and grassroots political groups to form the basis of the work, and continues to develop the project with the Michigan-Mellon Project on Egalitarianism and the Metropolis, including a focus on informal development and the socio-spatial translation of various political ideologies within public housing schemes. This upcoming cycle will be her second year as a Design Fellow with the program.

Suzanne Lettieri

Suzanne Lettieri is the co-principle of JeLe, an independent design and research practice.  For two years she served as a Visiting Critic at Cornell University and has worked at several architecture offices, including OMA, CODA, and Biber Architects. As project leader, she was involved with the design and construction of CODA’s Party Wall at MoMA PS1 (2013) and worked on the team at Biber Architects, under the leadership of the James Beard Foundation, for the USA Pavilion for the 2015 Milan World Expo. At OMA, she was part of the team for the Musée National des Beaux-Arts du Québec.

JeLe’s work has appeared in exhibitions in New York City, Boston and at Cornell with articles published in the journal Project, Cornell Journal of Architecture and accepted by the Association of Collegiate Schools of Architecture.

Lettieri received a master of architecture degree from Cornell and also holds a bachelor of fine arts, with a focus in interior design.

Humanities Fellows:

Michael Stauch

Michael Stauch is a postdoctoral fellow with the Michigan/Mellon Project on Egalitarianism and the Metropolis. He studies US history in the postwar period and is currently revising his manuscript, Wildcat of the Streets: A Social History of Mass Incarceration. Michael has presented papers at conferences for the Organization of American Historians, the Journal of Policy History, the Social Science History Association, the Labor and Working-Class History Association, and the North American Labor History Conference.

Austin McCoy

Austin McCoy is a historian whose research explores the relationship between transformations in political economy and the evolution of city- and state-based social movements. His dissertation, “No Radical Hangover:  Progressive Responses to Economic Crises in the Midwest, 1967-1988,” analyzes activists’ responses to plant closings and urban fiscal crises in the Midwest during the 1970s and 1980s. Austin recently published a historiographical essay on twentieth century labor history in the journal, Social History. He has presented papers at various national conferences including the Organization for American Historians, the Association for the Study of African American Life and History, and the North American Labor History Conference. Austin also writes about issues of race, gender, and culture for Nursing Clio, a blog that connects the practice of history to contemporary issues of gender and medicine.

View past Michigan-Mellon fellows