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Doctoral Colloquium Conversation 1-- Defining Design Studies: Interstitial Relationships in Architecture

Doctoral Colloquium Conversation 1-- Defining Design Studies: Interstitial Relationships in Architecture

Conversants (TBC): Sharon Haar, Abigail Murray/Steven Mankouche, Jana Cephas, Jean Wineman

Moderator: Kush Patel

Curators: Irene Brisson, Erin Hamilton, Babak Soleimani, Jieqiong Wang

Student and faculty research undertaken in Design Studies at Taubman College covers a wide range of architectural concerns. These range from environmental awareness and behavior in “green” building, to shifting relationships between urban and rural forms in China and Haiti, to the culture of midsize architectural practices, to the design and interpretation of social and professional space. To find common ground among such diverse subjects of study is challenging, and has given rise to a vigorous debate among students in this area of Doctoral Studies. We find, however, fertile ground for debating manifold research questions by defining the interstitial spaces between design, objects, and users as the essential link between our study of the designed environment today.

Doctor Studies Conversation 1 will foreground the complex relationships between three nodes—designers, objects of design, and users—as found in unconventional practices in architecture today. These include locating agency in design, environmental behavior research, creative reuse, and historical analysis of the socioeconomic formations of the built environment, insofar as these impact current practice and decision-making. Our conversation aims to highlight the contributions of design studies research to the practice and theory of architecture by asking our conversants to reflect on “interstitial space between design, objects, and users,” and thus to assist us in giving a new coherence to the shared terrain of our varied research projects.

Please contact Claire Zimmerman (zimclair@umich.edu) with questions regarding this event.

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