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Clement Blanchet

Visiting Associate Professor

Clément Blanchet, a French architect and critic, is a visiting associate professor at the University of Michigan’s Taubman College of Architecture and Urban Planning. He practices in the fields of architectural theory, urbanism, and cultural investigations. Blanchet is a former associate in the Office for Metropolitan Architecture (OMA), which he joined in 2004. In 2011, he was appointed director of OMA France. During his 10 years collaborating with Dutch architect Rem Koolhaas, he has contributed to the development of OMA France and led several winning projects for the firm, including the construction of Serpentine Gallery in London, the design and construction of Caen Library in France, the design and development of winning entries like the Convention and Exhibition Centre in Toulouse, master plans in Saclay and Bordeaux, and, most recently, the JJ Bosc bridge over the Garonne River in Bordeaux.

In May 2014, Clement founded Clement Blanchet Architecture (cBA) in Paris. The practice is structured as a laboratory that researches, informs, and generates architecture/urbanism in all of its forms. cBA continues to collaborate with OMA on several projects as a local architectural partner. The office is currently focusing on education issues through several winning competitions: the Innovation Campus in Antony, France (2017), the Carrefour Research And Development Center in Saclay, France (2017), and the creative center of the Ecole Centrale de Marseille (2018). Recently, the agency won an international competition for the creation of a 1,500-seat auditorium as part of the Grand Paris in EuropaCity.

Blanchet has been an invited critic at architecture schools in France, England, Holland, Denmark, and Sweden. Blanchet studied architecture at the Architectural Association School of Architecture in London, the Chulalongkorn Mahawitthayalai Architectural School in Bangkok, and the University of Illinois at Chicago. He graduated with high honors from the Architectural School of Versailles.